The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World In Flux Reviews

By | February 2, 2018
The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World In Flux

“The most important book I have read in many years.”
-Tony Wagner, Harvard University i-lab Expert in Residence, author of Creating Innovators

A leading educational thinker argues that the American university is stuck in the past–and shows how we can revolutionize it for our era of constant change
Our current system of higher education dates to the period from 1865 to 1925, when the nation’s new universities created grades and departments, majors and minors, in an attempt to prepare young people for a world transformed by the telegraph and the Model T. As Cathy N. Davidson argues in The New Education, this approach to education is wholly unsuited to the era of the gig economy. From the Ivy League to community colleges, she introduces us to innovators who are remaking college for our own time by emphasizing student-centered learning that values creativity in the face of change above all. The New Education ultimately shows how we can teach students not only to survive but to thrive amid the challenges to come.

3 thoughts on “The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World In Flux Reviews

  1. L.Grossberg
    11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    There is no doubt that education is both more important …, September 27, 2017
    By 
    L.Grossberg (USA) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World In Flux (Hardcover)
    There is no doubt that education is both more important than ever and, at the same time, suffering from a wide range of challenges, attacks, self-doubts, and crises. The New Education reminds us of two crucial ideas, at least concerning higher education. First, that the current structure of higher education–the structures of disciplines, the particular ways scholarship and teaching are unequally tethered together–are historical developments. The university has been changed in profound ways before as it endeavored to meet the challenges of its world, and to take advantage of the resources that world made available. The point is, the university can and should be changed–in fundamental ways. And second, that our understandings of the goals, means and practices of education also have and have to change, again in response to the changing demands and possibilities of the world we live in. But more than just make these arguments–compassionately AND persuasively, Davidson provides us with a series of truly inspiring examples of people and groups that are doing something about the crises of education now. I have been teaching a long time. Since reading The New Education, I have been thinking about pedagogical possibilities I had not even imagined before. If there is an academic equivalent of a page-turner, this is it.
  2. Phil Simon
    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Important and Timely, October 8, 2017
    By 
    Phil Simon (Tempe, AZ) –

    This review is from: The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World In Flux (Hardcover)
    As a new professor, I have a good deal to learn about contemporary higher education. Brass tacks: I can safely say that I am more informed about the industry’s challenges, opportunities, and history after reading Davidson’s book.

    Davidson points out the numerous and formidable challenges inhibiting higher ed. (Her tale of Alexander Coward at the UC Berkeley Mathematics Department reminded me of ‘Dead Poets Society.’) At the same time, though, she provides real solutions—and not just from a pedestal. Rather, she details a number of innovative programs, professors, and universities. The latter include my employer Arizona State University, Georgetown University, and many community colleges. Collectively, these progressive institutions are redefining education and providing students with the requisite skills necessary to succeed in an increasingly turbulent and complex world.

    Yes, we educators have our work cut out for us, but I am hopeful for the future.

    Disclaimer: Davidson’s publisher sent me a copy for a Huffington Post review or interview.

  3. Kindle Customer
    6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Some ideas to consider, not all new, December 21, 2017
    By 
    Kindle Customer (Atlanta, GA) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This book has some interesting ideas to think about in higher education. The author takes an anecdotal, story-telling approach, so read it for that and to explore some ideas. Don’t expect this book to have a scholarly approach with lots of primary references for further research, because those are present only on some of the topics. While I found some inspiration and curriculum development approaches here, I also found oversimplification and a pretty black-and-white separation of colleges and universities by types that don’t describe all the innovations and reinventions already in place in many liberal arts colleges.

    Still, her criticisms of higher education, particularly about cost, are true, and the book has potential to inspire change.

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